Amyloid Assemblies Once Believed to be Toxic Found to Play Key Role in Muscle Generation | oneAMYLOIDOSISvoice

Amyloid Assemblies Once Believed to be Toxic Found to Play Key Role in Muscle Generation


Toxic protein assemblies, or “amyloids,” long considered being key drivers in many neuromuscular diseases, also playing a beneficial role in the development of healthy muscle tissue, University of Colorado Boulder researchers have found.
 
“Ours is the first study to show that amyloid-like structures not only exist in healthy skeletal muscle during regeneration, but are likely important for its formation,” said co-first author Thomas Vogler, an M.D./PhD candidate in the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB).
 
The surprising finding, published today in the journal Nature, sheds new light on the potential origins of a host of incurable disorders, ranging from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) to inclusion body myopathy (which causes debilitating muscle degeneration) to certain forms of muscular dystrophy.
 
The researchers believe it could ultimately open new avenues for treating musculoskeletal diseases and also lend new understanding to related neurological disorders like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease, in which different amyloids play a role.
 
Amyloid Assemblies Once Believed To Be Toxic Found To Play Key Role In Muscle Generation

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