Depression and Anxiety in Patients With AL Amyloidosis as Assessed by the SF-36 Questionnaire | oneAMYLOIDOSISvoice
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Depression and Anxiety in Patients With AL Amyloidosis as Assessed by the SF-36 Questionnaire

key information

source: Amyloid: The International Journal of Experimental and Clinical Investigation

year: 2016

authors: Shu J, Lo S, Phillips M, Sun F, Seldin DC, Berenbaum I, Berk JL, Sanchorawala V

summary/abstract:

Background:

Our study examines depression and anxiety in patients with immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis, and determines the associations between the mental health problems and patient characteristics (age, gender, race, marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking status and cardiac involvement).

Methods:

Patients with AL amyloidosis who completed the 36-item Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36) during initial evaluation at a single center were studied. The SF-36 included assessments of depression, anxiety, role limitation due to emotional problems and the mental health subscale score.

Results:

From 1226 patients with AL amyloidosis, 37.0% reported depression and 46.7% reported anxiety. Patients with cardiac amyloidosis reported more anxiety (odds ratio (OR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.61) and role limitation due to emotional problems (OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.05-1.65). No significant association between cardiac involvement and depression was found (OR = 1.22, 95%CI 0.97-1.54). Men reported less anxiety (OR = 0.72, 95%CI 0.57-0.91). Patients ≥65 years experienced greater role limitation (OR = 1.36, 95%CI 1.08-1.71). Smokers (p = 0.019) and women (p = 0.006) scored lower on mental health subscales.

Conclusions:

Many patients with AL amyloidosis suffer from depression, anxiety and functional limitations. Psychiatric assessment and treatment is important, and further research is needed to clarify the long-term effects of depression and anxiety in AL amyloidosis. 

organization: Boston Medical Center, USA; Boston University School of Public Health, USA; Boston University School of Medicine, USA

DOI: 10.1080/13506129.2016.1208081

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