Understanding Transthyretin Amyloidosis | oneAMYLOIDOSISvoice
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Understanding Transthyretin Amyloidosis

key information

source: National Institutes of Health

year: 2019

summary/abstract:

Transthyretin amyloidosis is a slowly progressive condition characterized by the build-up of abnormal deposits of a protein called amyloid (amyloidosis) in the body’s organs and tissues. These protein deposits most frequently occur in the peripheral nervous system, which is made up of nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells that detect sensations such as touch, pain, heat, and sound. Protein deposits in these nerves result in a loss of sensation in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy). 
 
The autonomic nervous system, which controls involuntary body functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, and digestion, may also be affected by amyloidosis. In some cases, the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) are affected. Other areas of amyloidosis include the heart, kidneys, eyes, and gastrointestinal tract. The age at which symptoms begin to develop varies widely among individuals with this condition, and is typically between ages 20 and 70.
 
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