Treatment Patterns and Health Care Resource Utilization Among Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis | oneAMYLOIDOSISvoice
Scientific Articles

Treatment Patterns and Health Care Resource Utilization Among Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Systemic Light Chain Amyloidosis

key information

source: Amyloid: The International Journal of Experimental and Clinical Investigation

year: 2018

authors: Hari P, Lin HM, Asche CV, Ren J, Yong C, Luptakova K, Faller DV, Sanchorawala V

summary/abstract:

Background:

Treatment for patients with systemic light chain (AL) amyloidosis remains challenging. Our study aims to describe treatment patterns for both newly diagnosed and relapsed/refractory AL (RRAL) amyloidosis, and to assess clinical outcomes, healthcare costs, and resource utilization during the first year following a diagnosis of RRAL amyloidsis.

Methods:

This was a retrospective observational study of adult patients with AL amyloidosis using the US Optum administrative claims data during 1/1/2008 to 6/30/2015. Diagnosis was based on both ICD-9 codes and treatments with a claim for AL-amyloidosis-specific anticancer systemic agents.

Results:

Of 334 patients with AL amyloidosis, 43.1% were considered as RRAL amyloidosis. The majority (75%) of RRAL amyloidosis patients had organ involvement prior to the second line treatment. Proteasome-inhibitor-based regimens were most frequently used (41.0% for first-line AL, 30.6% for RRAL amyloidosis). Organ deterioration and mortality rates were 49.3% and 10.4%, respectively, during the two years following relapse. The average monthly cost was $14,369 per patient for RRAL amyloidosis including medical costs ($9441) and drug costs ($4928).

Conclusions:

RRAL amyloidosis is associated with high morbidity from target organ failure and mortality, which emphasizes the need for novel medications to improve care for patients with RRAL amyloidosis.

organization: Medical College of Wisconsin, USA; Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., USA; University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, USA; University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, USA; Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center, USA

DOI: 10.1080/13506129.2017.1411796

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